How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine 5th Edition (2014) (PDF) by Trisha Greenhalgh

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How to Read a Paper: The Basics of Evidence-Based Medicine 5th Edition (2014) (PDF) by Trisha Greenhalgh

Basic Information:

  • Year: 2014
  • Page Number: 458 pages
  • File Type: PDF
  • File Size: 2,06 MB
  • Authors/ Editiors: Trisha Greenhalgh

Description:

The best-selling introduction to evidence-based medicineIn a clear and engaging style, How to Read a Paper demystifies evidence-based medicine and explains how to critically appraise published research and also put the findings into practice.An ideal introduction to evidence-based medicine, How to Read a Paper explains what to look for in different types of papers and how best to evaluate the literature and then implement the findings in an evidence-based, patient-centred way. Helpful checklist summaries of the key points in each chapter provide a useful framework for applying the principles of evidence-based medicine in everyday practice.This fifth edition has been fully updated with new examples and references to reflect recent developments and current practice. It also includes two new chapters on applying evidence-based medicine with patients and on the common criticisms of evidence-based medicine and responses.How to Read a Paper is a standard text for medical and nursing schools as well as a friendly guide for everyone wanting to teach or learn the basics of evidence-based medicine.

User’s Review:

Editorial Reviews: Review “This book adds much to the evidence-based practice debates. After discussing the mechanics of the evidence, it analyzes why it is difficult to change practice habits and how to address these issues. This is a valuable book for every academic library.” (Doody’s, 23 January 2015) “I would recommend this to anyone who is interested in reading and understanding published research papers but who does not have a scientific background. Enjoy the read then keep for later reference.” (Occupational Medicine, 1 March 2015) From the Back Cover The best-selling introduction to evidence-based medicineIn a clear and engaging style, How to Read a Paper demystifies evidence-based medicine and explains how to critically appraise published research and also put the findings into practice.An ideal introduction to evidence-based medicine, How to Read a Paper explains what to look for in different types of papers and how best to evaluate the literature and then implement the findings in an evidence-based, patient-centred way. Helpful checklist summaries of the key points in each chapter provide a useful framework for applying the principles of evidence-based medicine in everyday practice.This fifth edition has been fully updated with new examples and references to reflect recent developments and current practice. It also includes two new chapters on applying evidence-based medicine with patients and on the common criticisms of evidence-based medicine and responses.How to Read a Paper is a standard text for medical and nursing schools as well as a friendly guide for everyone wanting to teach or learn the basics of evidence-based medicine. About the Author Trisha Greenhalgh OBE, FRCGP, FRCP, Professor of Primary Health Care and Dean for Research Impact, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK Read more

Reviews from Amazon users which were colected at the time this book was published on the website:

⭐I am disappointed. I am a statistician and non-MD epidemiologist actively engaged in research and the training of clinical and non-clinical users of research. The author of this book, a senior British MD, certainly knows her way around the arena of research publishing. The overall presentation is old-school and bleak, focusing on the myriad of errors and biases that make particular research projects “useless” much more than on the continuing efforts of experts in research design to systematize good practice. In fact, many “biases” in today’s research practice are explicit, pragmatic choices whose effects are a matter of measurable degree. Dr. Greenhalgh might seem to agree about the pragmatism, but the part about measurable impact is not on the agenda here at all. Her presentation is about total failures, easily detected via checklists. One recurrent motif is to conflate mistaken design practices (malpractice?) that may have been published in the past but automatically get manuscripts rejected today. Surely the quality of published research has improved over time. Since Madame Curie? Since Jeckyl and Hyde? Galen?My reading of the chapters covering topics about which I am most expert is that the advice on offer is not helpful or up-to-date. On questionnaire-based research, we are told that response rates under 70% are unacceptable– a binary, blanket treatment of a continuous quality and cost measure. Further, we are instructed that questionnaire items requiring retrospection or honesty from respondents are “invalid”– again a binary treatment of a subject that has fostered much innovation. On sample size and power, an initially smart dissection of the issue degenerates into tricky locutions without much helpful elaboration. How many variants of the intervention are to be included? How many subpopulations deserve separate analysis? Is a bigger sample always better? That’s what I deal with routinely as a researcher, but I don’t see it here.A book like this is very much needed. But the premise of this book is that medical practitioners need a primer, written by a trusted insider, that will make them more informed participants in evidence-based medicine (EBM). All well and good. Such a book cannot, however, turn a practitioner untrained in research into a journal editor– but it surely feeds that hope in any reader. A much shorter book could have served to make EBM consumers sufficiently wary of the challenges of research. As an educator I cannot conceive how to overcome this book’s tone while teaching medical residents, for example, to assess research for their own practice or to participate in research at their institutions.

⭐Lots of good information and a great read for people who need to know how to read research papers correctly. I have issues with the number of parenthesis and the number of sentences contained in a single parenthesis, it makes for very confusing reading. Additionally the book tends to repeat itself frequently, making for long and tedious chapters.

⭐Had to have this for school. I still can’t believe I paid $47 for this book. Did not care for her style of writing- too wordy. Too much money.

⭐My previous experience is with basic research papers, this book is a great primer on medical trial design and significance.

⭐The quintessential introduction to understanding how clinical trials actually work, and deciphering the meaning and implications of their findings. A must-have.

⭐Easy read and helps provide useful information to discriminate between good and bad studies.

⭐Why I needed this for a class? Not sure. Don’t use it

⭐This should be required reading in every Nursing school. I wish that I had found this book two years ago when completing my Master’s in Nursing.

⭐Personally, for my learning style this book didn’t work for me. It’s a well written book, however it writes in long prose, in quite a chatty style. I found it really hard to read the long passages, and I’d just look my place and lose my train of thought. I picked up “The Doctor’s Guide to Critical Appraisal” which broke things down into scenarios, tables, bullet points etc. and I found that a lot easier to digest. I think it’s personal preference though as some people absolutely rave about this book, it just wasn’t my cup of tea.

⭐Incredibly informative and helpful in conducting a critical review of an occupational science qualitative study for my PGDip in occupational therapy. Really well-written and well-informed and easy to understand to someone very new to the scientific academic style of writing.

⭐Good book to help understand about reading articles. Easy to follow.

⭐Small writing. Not the easiest read. I found other books easier to process

⭐This book makes topics that could quite easily be tiring to read through interesting and the chapters on how to read a paper are engaging and easy to understand. However you will need a seperate book for statistics though. The book goes off tangent slightly in the last few chapters as there are several sections devoted to how to apply EBM. Note the books main title is how to read a paper which I think only 75% of it is. Despite this the book will structure the way you read papers allow meaningful critical appraisal of papers.

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